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Saint Therese Deep Rose Rosary

ITEM # RS18a
St Therese Deep Rose Rosary

Handmade Gifts O Faith Original
20" Long - Custom Designed


This devotional rosary was made with 6mm and 8mm deep rose Czech glass aurora borealis beads. The Pater (Our Father) beads are silver capped. The center is a 1" round silver ox Saint Therese Medal. The 2" tall silver ox Crucifix is adorned with grapes. Fashioned with durable nickel silver findings.

$ 12.49
 

Saint Therese, the "Little Flower"

"Jesus set the book of nature before me and I saw that all the flowers he has created are lovely. The splendor of the rose and the whiteness of the lily do not rob the little violet of its scent nor the daisy of its simple charm. I realized that if every tiny flower wanted to be a rose, spring would lose its loveliness and there would be no wildflowers to make the meadows gay.

It is just the same in the world of souls - which is the garden of Jesus. He has created the great saints who are like the lilies and the roses, but he has also created much lesser saints and they must be content to be the daisies or the violets which rejoice his eyes whenever he glances down. Perfection consists in doing his will, in being that which he wants us to be.

Jesus, help me to simplify my life by learning what you want me to be - and becoming that person."


Saint Therese of Lisieux, from "Story of a Soul"



"Oh! no, you will see...it will be like a shower of roses. After my death, you will go to the mail box, and you will find many consolations."

Saint Therese quote on 9 June 1897 after Sister Marie told her they would be very sorry after she died

Saint Therese
Therese Martin was born in Alencon, France, in 1873.  She entered the Carmelite monastery at Lisieux at a very young age. She lived a simple life in the monastery and was happy in performing even the lowliest of tasks. She taught the virtues of her beliefs to her sisters and the community by example as well as in words. After her death on September 30, 1897, her works were published. Soon afterward, she became known to the world as the "Little Flower". The Pope not only canonized her but also recognized her as a "Doctor of the Church".